MELECHESH: Track-by-Track Analysis of “The Epigenesis”

Guitarist/vocalist Ashmedi of Mesopotamian blackened thrash pioneers MELECHESH, has issued the first of several track by track explanations of songs from their forthcoming album. The Epigenesis will be released on October 1 in Europe and on October 26 in North America via Nuclear Blast Records. Look for an interview with SMNnews to appear shortly!

1. Ghouls Of Nineveh

“This song is a statement on how one riff can be effective and devastating!  It is very powerful and live it is neck breaking. The song itself revolved around a singular riff, very non cliché to extreme metal. Some people expected a conformist start for the album, i.e. a faster song and we rejected the idea. This song sets the mood for a multi faceted album. This song is almost like a hymn. ‘Ghouls of Nineveh’ revolves around Assyrian/Mesopotamian deities, who are the Annunaki. Some of the brass bells you hear are a result of a pestle and mortar I found in my childhood house in Jerusalem when I went for a visit. The brass pestle and mortar was in my house as far as I can recall, yet this time when I was there in 2009,  I experimented with it and the sound was bright. Better than any bell I know of. So I confiscated it and used it on the album as a percussive instrument! The final guitar lead was improvised on the spot and the piano cosmetic lead was split between Reuben the engineer and myself. This Fazioli Grand piano cost as much as a house in some parts of the USA ($120,000), so I was slightly careful with it!”

2. Grand Gathas of Baal Sin

“Gathas are the sacred writings of Zarathustra. However I liked to integrate themes and made Gathas for Lord Sin (Baal is not only a deity but actually the word means Lord). Sin is the name of the Mesopotamian moon deity so it is a play on words. Musically this song is meant to resemble a stampede or a whirlwind of chaos with frantic riffing tones, which breaks with epic middle eastern scaling and beats. The drum toms on this song represent war drums or ritualistic drums. With the set of right speakers the drum toms are explosive and bombastic. The group Chanting ‘Sin Baal Sin Baal’ remind me with Sufi rituals. There is a little part in the end like a jam with non distorted guitars. This was purely by chance the tape was rolling and I could only hear drum tracks so I jammed on the drums on a couple of channels. Eventually we thought ok lets use it. The very final note on the song is the Persian Santur.”


MELECHESH
have made the track “Grand Gathas Of Baal Sin” available for streaming on their Myspace page www.myspace.com/Melechesh. The track comes from the bands new album The Epigenesis.

The Epigenesis
was recorded in the newly built first class Babajim Studios in Istanbul, Turkey. The album was mixed by Reuben de Lautour and mastered by Pieter Snapper. In an unprecedented move in metal, the band chose to record the album entirely in Istanbul in an attempt to capture the inspiring surroundings. Babajim Studios is run by some of the most elite sound engineers in Turkey.

The artwork to their long awaited 5th album was handled by renowned UK based occult artist John Coulthart, whom the band has previously collaborated with before.


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